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Eating the Ocean

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Rorotoko – Interview with Elspeth Probyn

By | Eating the Ocean, Latest News, News

In a nutshell …

My book explores how we eat the ocean, in many ways, every day, sometimes without knowing it. Of course we know when we consciously eat fish – battered, breaded, grilled, steamed, or raw – and when we tongue delicious health-sustaining oysters, or partake of steaming bowls of relatively sustainable mussels. What we may not be aware of is that 25% of the global ocean catch disappears into fish oil and fishmeal. In this form fish turn up in supermarket white bread fortified with omega 3, cosmetic products, pet food, and become food for farmed fish.

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Book Review

By | Eating the Ocean, Latest News

Geoff O’Brien reviews Eating the Ocean in the International Journal of Environmental Studies.

When I first saw the cover of this book I assumed that this would be a kind of polemic against the horrors of our treatment of the oceans and the creatures that live in them. This book does discuss all that, but is more profound than citing our impacts.

Eating the ocean review

Sustainable fish lab - image of tuna swimming

Eating the Ocean out Dec 6 2016

By | Eating the Ocean, Latest News

Professor Elspeth Probyn’s new book, Eating the Ocean, will be released 6 December 2016.  An early review by Philip Hoare in Times Higher Education says:

Elspeth Probyn wants to eat the ocean. I want to eat her book. It is one of the most profound works I have read on the sea, and the issues with which it presents us, in the 21st century, not least because it dares to digress and move into territories that other writers and academics have hitherto neglected.

Confronting the notion that our future consumption of the ocean’s resources may end with us eating “jellyfish and chips”, Probyn takes apart the polarised politics of seafood. It is ironic that “enlightened” consumers turn to fish for reasons of ethics or health, when in fact its harvest is one of the most problematic that we humans engage in. Eating local, responsibly sourced fish sounds wonderful, but Probyn shows how this is at best “drenched in condescension”, and “fork-waving” advice, as disseminated in the media. And at worst, it is a drastically simplified and often class- and even race-based “choice”.

You can read the introduction here, and order it online.

Order early and get a discount here: Eating the Ocean discount code